Brendan Kelly

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Inflammation, Anxiety and Climate Change

In our era of climate crisis, Chinese medicine can not only offer healing on the small-scale of the individual it also has a vital role in helping address the large-scale ecological imbalances that now confront us. And rather than being separate issues, what’s happening within us is being reflected in the warming and destabilizing of the climate around us. Over thirty years of climate science indicates conclusively that the planet is warming and the weather has become unstable from what we’ve been emitting. Called greenhouse gases because they hold warmth in the atmosphere in a way similar to greenhouses, they’re released into the atmosphere from the burning of oil, gas, coal and other fossil fuels. We burn them for warming and cooling our homes, clinics and schools. We burn them to create electricity. We burn them when we drive and fly. We burn them to manufacture the clothes we wear,…

Healing Lyme Naturally

Over the past several years our clinical practice has evolved so that we are treating a significant number of patients with Lyme disease. Over half of the new patients I treat now have a Lyme diagnosis. Part of our increased clinical focus on Lyme is that the number of people with the condition here in Vermont and nationally is increasing rapidly.The Centers for Disease Control estimates that 300,000 people become infected each year. Where we practice here in Vermont has one of the highest rates of Lyme in the US. And with these significant number of Lyme diagnoses patient advocacy groups, including the International Lyme and Associated Disease Society, believe that these already elevated numbers are low by many magnitudes.There are many symptoms associated with Lyme: skin redness with an initial tick bite, fever, joint and whole body pain, fatigue, digestive and gastro-intestinal issues, cognitive/thinking issues and neurological issues including…

Happy Spring

Here in northern Vermont, we’re experiencing the transition from Winter to Spring. The temperatures are increasing, the light is returning and the piles of snow are mostly melted. Birds are chirping for the first time in months and the first of the buds are appearing on trees. And the iconic process of making maple syrup is happening–smoke is rising from the tops of sugar houses as the sweet water from maple trees is cooked into syrup.For Chinese medicine, this transition from the cold and dormancy of Winter to the warmth and re-birth of Spring is a time of often dramatic change. Just as nature is waking up, now is the time when our energy is waking up as well. When we’re in balance, Spring is a time of excitement where new things are possible and physical and mental activity naturally increases. It’s the time of the year to get outside…

Climate Change and Chinese Medicine

The latest science on climate change warns that the Earth is in serious trouble. Sea levels are rising, biodiversity loss is accelerating, and extreme weather events—from the polar vortex to summer typhoons—are wreaking havoc. If we are to survive, we must change our lifestyle so that the Earth can regain its natural balance and return to equilibrium. The idea of restoring balance is an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. Recently practitioners of this art have been applying their expertise to the problem of climate change, examining it in a holistic way and taking into account the relationship between individual well-being and the global environment. The Yin and Yang of Climate One of the best known books on this topic is The Yin and Yang of Climate Crisis by Brendan Kelly. Kelly, a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine, explains how the contrasting opposites of yin (contentment and coolness) with yang…

Lyme Disease: The Chinese Medicine Approach

Brendan Kelly shares his vast experience with Lyme Disease, tell us how at least 50% of his practice right now is treating people at various stages of Lyme. He explains why Chinese Medicine (which includes foods, herbs and acupuncture) is so effective treating Lyme. In this episode he shares: The progression of Lyme through four different stages; what Chinese Medicine calls each stage and how they manifest in different symptomsWhat to do at each stage of the disease, what foods to eat and how lifestyle affects each stageWhy there is no single remedy for Lyme but rather how Chinese Medicine treats the individual rather than the diseaseThe connection between Lyme and climate change

Anger: Constructive or Destructive?

Episode Notes: Brendan Kelly shares with us the Chinese Medicine wisdom on anger. In this conversation we touch on: What is anger?What’s the healthy, appropriate and constructive expression of anger?What happens when we stifle or suppress our anger?Why our world itself seems to be angry…The force of anger in social change… from oppression of minorities to global warming…What we can do today to channel our anger. To learn more about Brendan’s work, you can visit his website; and to read more about his book, The Yin & Yang of Climate Change and purchase it you can visit this link right here.

Internal Climate Change

Almost all of what we hear about climate change comes from our usual western perspective. There are important discussions about the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase carbon sequestration, eat local food, and question continuous economic growth. While these concerns are of real and urgent importance, they focus on the symptoms of the climate crisis rather than the deeper, root causes. If we were to look at climate change from a different vantage point, we could see that what is happening in the environment around us is also happening within us. For several thousand years, Chinese medicine has understood the world holistically. Part of this holism is the holographic understanding that the small picture and the big picture are the same picture—the only difference is one of scale. Using the lens of Chinese medicine, we can understand that the severity of climate change speaks to deeper and more wide-reaching…

The Belief in Continuous Growth

As has been discussed by many authors, the ecological effects of an economy based on growth are far-reaching. Despite what advertisements and manufacturers might imply, the things that we buy do not simply materialize out of thin air. Things like shoes, cars, and phones come from somewhere and are made from actual things. And much of the manufacture of these things is unsustainable both in terms of what is being taken from nature as well as what is being returned in terms of waste. We are converting physical aspects of nature into commodities that we can buy and sell, often creating toxicity in the process. The overwhelming emphasis of our economy is on buying new things and, soon after, replacing them with more new things. As we discussed before, this economic emphasis is on the Yang, and from a Five Phases perspective it’s also about the Wood. And as it…

Coffee and Climate Change: Personal and Global Overstimulation

The National Coffee Association says 83% of Americans drink coffee, and that we’re the world’s biggest consumer of the beverage. With new gadgets and gourmet brews it’s an estimated $30+ Billion industry. But is coffee actually good for our health? Are we drinking more coffee to keep up with the increasing pace of the American lifestyle? Brendan Kelly, co-founder of the Chinese medicine clinic Jade Mountain Wellness in Burlington, Vermont and author of The Yin and Yang of Climate Crisis, offers valuable insight on the Chinese Medicine perspective of coffee, here’s an excerpt from his new book: But I heard that coffee was good for you. Coffee is clearly stimulating and does increase blood flow to the brain and other areas. It can provide a lift of energy, but many short-term fixes come with long-term costs. In addition to this heat, coffee is also damp, which can trap the overstimulation and make it harder…

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